Implementing C. 169

Documents

Introtext - Convention No. 169 in practice.doc

chapter

Power point

Implementation of Convention 169.ppt
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Implementation of Convention 169 SOUND.ppt
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chapter

Video

video stillSpain's ratification of Convention No. 169
Rafael Soriano, Deputy Director,
Spanish Agency for
International Development Cooperation.

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High res (mov - 68 Mb)

 

video stillImplementation of
Convention No. 169 in Nepal

Gangadutta Awasthi, Secretary of Minister, Ministry of Local Development, Nepal

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video stillOvercoming oppression of
indigenous peoples in Nepal

Dev Gurung,
Minister of Local Development, Nepal

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High res (mov - 68 Mb)

 

chapter

DVD - Four Case studies on Convention No. 169 in Nepal

Living without electricity next to a hydroelectric dam.

View Trailer (wmv 6,3Mb)

devils miner

Based on the wording of Articles from Convention No. 169, the film investigates four cases of violations of indigenous peoples' rights in Nepal. One is a hydroelectric dam that has led to flooding of land without proper compensation to the indigenous people living there. Another is a limestone factory, pushing indigenous peoples off their land, while a third case is dealing with lack of educational materials for mother tongue education of indigenous children.

devils miner

By using the text of Convention No. 169 as a framework and comparing this to the reality of indigenous peoples, the film provides an interesting starting point for discussions on the implementation of essential articles of the Convention.

Produced by Lahurnip: Nepal
Copyright:
International Labour Organisation
Duration: 20 minutes
Year of production: 2006

View Trailer (wmv 6,3Mb)

chapter

DVD - Looking for the revolution

View trailer - www.whydemocracy.net/film/6

devils miner

Under pressure from the masses who gave him a clear mandate, the first indigenous President of Bolivia, Evo Morales (an ex-coca leaf farmer), is promising to conduct a revolution. He has nationalised the oil industry and passed laws on Agrarian reform. Despite the revolutionary-sounding election speeches and campaign iconography that accompanied his landslide victory, on closer inspection it emerges that the old system is pretty much alive inside the new one and corruption, nepotism and old-fashioned populism are not easy to eradicate.

devils miner

The more Morales does to create employment, the more the landowners conspire against him and paralyse Bolivia's economy. As a result, no jobs are created and the pressure from the poor increases. The cycle of tension threatens to crush both the country and the indigenous revolution. "Looking for the Revolution" is about the dynamics of that tension as witnessed by the characters of the film - the struggle for power between landowners and the indigenous movement, and the continuation of a revolution, which started long ago.

In Boliva, the government of Evo Morales has based the changes they wish to carry through on, among other things, the ILO Convention No. 169. Thus, the film can be seen as an illustration of the complexities of implementing the Convention, when it touches upon long-term processes of historic marginalisation and exclusion.

Director: Rodrigo Vazquez

View trailer - www.whydemocracy.net/film/6